Thursday, August 17

Tag: PostgreSQL

News and Roadmap from Postgres-XL 10

2ndQuadrant, Pavan's PlanetPostgreSQL
We expect Postgres-XL 10 to be released in the next few months, with the new features of partitioning and logical replication. You’ll be able to load Postgres-XL directly from PostgreSQL. For the first time, you’ll be able to run massively parallel queries both across the datanodes and within the datanodes to give huge performance gains. Earlier today, we updated the master branch of the Postgres-XL repository to include all commits from PostgreSQL's master branch up to June 26. That means the XL project is now fully to date with the PostgreSQL source code, meaning there is now only minimal lag between PostgreSQL and Postgres-XL. At this point the code is only in Development/Alpha, though we expect to produce Beta1 soon after PostgreSQL Beta 3 in August. Support from the (more…)

PostgreSQL Popularity Continues to Grow!

Simon's PlanetPostgreSQL
Some years ago, I prophesized that PostgreSQL would win in the end, and that we would be able to tell because there would be "Microsoft PostgreSQL". I am happy to report that has now happened. Microsoft PostgreSQL database service on Azure was announced recently. Of course, that was just a metaphor for "a.n.other big company", I'm not signalling MS as requiring special attention here, in fact they have been the last to do this. That means PostgreSQL database services are now available from all of the main cloud service providers: Amazon, Google, IBM and Microsoft. Yay! We have achieved 100% breakthrough in terms of cloud adoption - everyone recognizes now that PostgreSQL is big and adoption is accelerating. PostgreSQL is now used in UK and US governments, see UK (http://www. (more…)

More robust collations with ICU support in PostgreSQL 10

Eisentraut's PlanetPostgreSQL, PostgreSQL
In this article, I want to introduce the ICU support in PostgreSQL, which I have worked on for PostgreSQL version 10, to appear later this year. Sorting Sorting is an important functionality of a database system. First, users generally want to see data sorted. Any query result that contains more than one row and is destined for end-user consumption will probably want to be sorted, just for a better user experience. Second, a lot of the internal functionality of a database system depends on sorting data or having sorted data available. B-tree indexes are an obvious example. BRIN indexes have knowledge of order. Range partitioning has to compare values. Merge joins depend on sorted input. The idea that is common to these different techniques is that, roughly speaking, if you (more…)

PostgreSQL 10 identity columns explained

Eisentraut's PlanetPostgreSQL, PostgreSQL
For PostgreSQL 10, I have worked on a feature called "identity columns". Depesz already wrote a blog post about it and showed that it works pretty much like serial columns: CREATE TABLE test_old ( id serial PRIMARY KEY, payload text ); INSERT INTO test_old (payload) VALUES ('a'), ('b'), ('c') RETURNING *; and CREATE TABLE test_new ( id int GENERATED BY DEFAULT AS IDENTITY PRIMARY KEY, payload text ); INSERT INTO test_new (payload) VALUES ('a'), ('b'), ('c') RETURNING *; do pretty much the same thing, except that the new way is more verbose. ;-) So why bother? Compatibility The new syntax conforms to the SQL standard. Creating auto-incrementing columns has been a notorious area of incompatibility between different SQL implementations. Some (more…)

“Now is Better Than Never” – Why I decided to attend PyCon8…

2ndQuadrant, Britt's PlanetPostgreSQL
…and why I’m glad I did. It’s not all technical… Who knew?! Last year, Pycon7 was held right about the time I joined 2ndQuadrant. Seeing as I was new to the technology AND the Italian language (note: there was an English track), I opted out of attending. Well, after attending Pycon8, I can say that I won’t make that mistake again! Over the past year working in the Open Source community, I’ve learned more technical information than I could have ever imagined. Even then, attending a technical conference and understanding (completely) technical talks seemed a little far-fetched. Or so I thought! Since being introduced to the wonderful world of Open Source, PostgreSQL, and numerous other technologies - I’m continuously fascinated by the way that the communities (more…)

Using the PostgreSQL TAP framework in extensions

Craig's PlanetPostgreSQL
Support for using the TAP protocol to run extended regression tests was added to PostgreSQL back in 9.4 with the adoption of Perl's prove tool and Test::More to test initdb, pg_basebackup, etc. Since then the TAP-based tests have been greatly expanded, particularly with the advent of the src/test/recovery tests and the PostgresNode module in PostgreSQL 9.6. PostgreSQL now comes with a built-in test harness for easily starting up postgres instances, creating and restoring backups for replication, setting up streaming, and lots more. You can now use this to test your extensions. pg_regress and its limitations Extensions have long supported pg_regress based tests. Just drop the test scripts in sql/. Put the expected results in expected/. List the test names (sans directory and file (more…)