Saturday, June 24

Tag: postgres

Kanban & devops culture at 2ndQuadrant – Part 2

DevOps
In Part 2 of this series, we will continue our journey within the developmental dynamics of the Barman open source project for PostgreSQL database backup and disaster recovery. After providing a small introduction to devops and Kanban in Part 1, let's focus on the basic element of our daily management: The Boards.(more…)

Using the PostgreSQL TAP framework in extensions

Craig's PlanetPostgreSQL
Support for using the TAP protocol to run extended regression tests was added to PostgreSQL back in 9.4 with the adoption of Perl's prove tool and Test::More to test initdb, pg_basebackup, etc.Since then the TAP-based tests have been greatly expanded, particularly with the advent of the src/test/recovery tests and the PostgresNode module in PostgreSQL 9.6. PostgreSQL now comes with a built-in test harness for easily starting up postgres instances, creating and restoring backups for replication, setting up streaming, and lots more.You can now use this to test your extensions. pg_regress and its limitations Extensions have long supported pg_regress based tests. Just drop the test scripts in sql/. Put the expected results in expected/. List the test names (sans directory and file ex...

Barman 2.1 and the new –archive option

Giulio's PlanetPostgreSQL
Barman 2.1 Version 2.1 of Barman, backup and recovery manager for PostgreSQL, was released Thursday, Jan. 5.The new release, along with several bugfixes, introduces preliminary support for the upcoming PostgreSQL 10, and adds the --archive option to the switch-xlog command. switch-xlog --archive The new --archive option is especially useful when setting up a new server.Until now, the switch-xlog command used to force the PostgreSQL server to switch to a different transaction log file. Now, Barman also gives the --archive option, which triggers WAL archiving after the xlog switch, and forces Barman to wait for the archival of the closed WAL file.By default Barman expects to receive the WAL in 30 seconds, the amount of seconds to wait can be changed using the --archive-timeout...
PGDay.IT 2016 in Prato, Italy

PGDay.IT 2016 in Prato, Italy

2ndQuadrant, Jonathan's PlanetPostgreSQL
This year, the ITPUG (Italian Postgres User Group) organized PGDay in Prato, my hometown and city where the association was born, although most of the members are from outside of the Tuscany region.It was my pleasure to contribute to the community by sharing my professional experience. I gave a talk about PostgreSQL on Network File System, a research based on crash tests to prove reliability using PostgreSQL on NFS. Sharing my PostgreSQL experience with the participants was useful and pleasant.During the event, I had the chance to attend the talk about tools for upgrading Postgres between major releases given by Denis Gasparin; and the one about ULSS's (Regional Healthcare System) migration to Open Source, given by Giorgio Roncolato, proving that more institutions than we thought a

The PostgreSQL License – What Does It Mean For My Business?

Umair's PlanetPostgreSQL
When I talk to various people about PostgreSQL, based on where they are in the process of analyzing it, I get asked many similar questions. One of the most frequently asked questions is: What is the PostgreSQL licensing model? Here is my attempt to address this question from the perspective of what the PostgreSQL license means for your business. Go Ahead, Read It - It’s Really Not That Scary Let’s be honest with ourselves, we are really not in the habit of reading license agreements - they are best left to the legal department to decipher. And seriously, licenses have become so complex and so detailed that even if I try really really hard to read just a few clauses, my head starts to hurt.The PostgreSQL License is different though.I have reproduced the license in full at the e
Back to the Future Part 3: pg_rewind with PostgreSQL 9.6

Back to the Future Part 3: pg_rewind with PostgreSQL 9.6

2ndQuadrant, Giuseppe's PlanetPostgreSQL
This is the third and last part of blog articles dedicated to pg_rewind. In the two previous articles we have seen how pg_rewind is useful to fix split-brain events due to mistakes in the switchover procedures, avoiding the need of new base backups. We have also seen that this is true for simple replication clusters, where more standby nodes are involved. In this case, just two nodes can be fixed, and the other ones need a new base backup to be re-synchronised. pg_rewind for PostgreSQL 9.6 is now able to work with complex replication clusters.Indeed, pg_rewind has been extended so it can view the timeline history graph of an entire HA cluster, like the one mentioned in my previous blog article. It is able to find out the most recent, shared point in the timeline history between...

Untangling the PostgreSQL upgrade

pglogical, PostgreSQL
PostgreSQL 9.6 has just been released and most of the postgres users will start asking themselves how to upgrade to the new major version. This post has the intention of showing different procedures for upgrading your PostgreSQL server.Upgrading to a new major version is a task which has a high ratio of preparation over total execution time. Specifically when skipping a release in the middle, for example, when you jump from version 9.3 to version 9.5. Point releases On the other hand, point release upgrades don't need as much preparation. Generally, the only requirement is for the postgres service to be restarted. There are no changes to the underlying data structure, so there's no need to dump and restore. In the worst case scenario you may need to recreate some of your indexes ...
Committed to the PostgreSQL Community, 2ndQuadrant Contributes to 9.6

Committed to the PostgreSQL Community, 2ndQuadrant Contributes to 9.6

2ndQuadrant, Featured, Umair's PlanetPostgreSQL
The latest version of PostgreSQL 9.6 is planned to be released later today, bringing with it some much anticipated features and updates. As the most advanced open source database, PostgreSQL strives to release a major version roughly once every year. With an active and collaborative community, this PostgreSQL release boasts impressive features and updates thanks to contributions from many of the highly knowledgeable community members.  The expanding team at 2ndQuadrant has continued to show dedication to the PostgreSQL database project by contributing heavily to the PostgreSQL 9.6 release. Parallel execution of large queries has been a known shortcoming of PostgreSQL for some time, but this is no longer an issue with the 9.6 release. David Rowley and Simon Riggs contributed to this