Posts Tagged "performance"

Benchmark on a Parallel Processing Monster!

Last year I wrote about a benchmark which I performed on the Parallel Aggregate feature that I worked on for PostgreSQL 9.6.  I was pretty excited to see this code finally ship in September last year, however something stood out on the release announcement that I didn’t quite understand: Scale Up with Parallel Query Version 9.6…

Basics of Tuning Checkpoints

On systems doing non-trivial number of writes, tuning checkpoints is crucial for getting good performance. Yet checkpoints are one of the areas where we often identify confusion and configuration issues, both on the community mailing lists and during performance tuning reviews for our customers. (The other one being autovacuum, discussed a few days ago by…

Postgres-XL Scalability for Loading Data

In my last blog, we looked at the benchmark results from bulk load test for a Postgres-XL database cluster. Using a 16-datanode, 2-coordinator cluster, running on EC2 instances, we could easily clock 9M rows/sec or 3TB/hr of ingestion rate. That’s a significant number in itself. In this blog, we’ll see if the ingestion rate is…

Load data in Postgres-XL at over 9M rows/sec

We are faced with this question: “What’s the ingestion rate of Postgres-XL?”, and I realised I don’t have a very good answer to that. Since recently we made some good improvements in this area, I was curious to know too. Well, I decided to benchmark. Hardware and Software For the tests, I used a Postgres-XL cluster running…

Evolution of Fault Tolerance in PostgreSQL: Synchronous Commit

PostgreSQL is an awesome project and it evolves at an amazing rate. We’ll focus on evolution of fault tolerance capabilities in PostgreSQL throughout its versions with a series of blog posts. This is the fourth post of the series and we’ll talk about synchronous commit and its effects on fault tolerance and dependability of PostgreSQL….

PostgreSQL vs. Linux kernel versions

I’ve published multiple benchmarks comparing different PostgreSQL versions, as for example the performance archaeology talk (evaluating PostgreSQL 7.4 up to 9.4), and all those benchmark assumed fixed environment (hardware, kernel, …). Which is fine in many cases (e.g. when evaluating performance impact of a patch), but on production those things do change over time –…

Evolution of Fault Tolerance in PostgreSQL: Time Travel

PostgreSQL is an awesome project and it evolves at an amazing rate. We’ll focus on evolution of fault tolerance capabilities in PostgreSQL throughout its versions with a series of blog posts. This is the third post of the series and we’ll talk about timeline issues and their effects on fault tolerance and dependability of PostgreSQL….

On the benefits of sorted paths

I had the pleasure to attend PGDay UK last week – a very nice event, hopefully I’ll have the chance to come back next year. There was plenty of interesting talks, but the one that caught my attention in particular was Performace for queries with grouping by Alexey Bashtanov. I have given a fair number…

PostgreSQL 9.6: Parallel Sequential Scan

For a long time, one of the most known shortcomings of PostgreSQL was the ability to parallelise queries. With the release of version 9.6, this will no longer be an issue. A great job has been done on this subject, starting from the commit 80558c1, the introduction of parallel sequential scan, which we will see…

Evolution of Fault Tolerance in PostgreSQL: Replication Phase

PostgreSQL is an awesome project and it evolves at an amazing rate. We’ll focus on evolution of fault tolerance capabilities in PostgreSQL throughout its versions with a series of blog posts. This is the second post of the series and we’ll talk about replication and its importance on fault tolerance and dependability of PostgreSQL. If…

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