Tuesday, October 24

Tag: devops

PGDay.IT 2016 in Prato, Italy

PGDay.IT 2016 in Prato, Italy

2ndQuadrant, Jonathan's PlanetPostgreSQL
This year, the ITPUG (Italian Postgres User Group) organized PGDay in Prato, my hometown and city where the association was born, although most of the members are from outside of the Tuscany region. It was my pleasure to contribute to the community by sharing my professional experience. I gave a talk about PostgreSQL on Network File System, a research based on crash tests to prove reliability using PostgreSQL on NFS. Sharing my PostgreSQL experience with the participants was useful and pleasant. During the event, I had the chance to attend the talk about tools for upgrading Postgres between major releases given by Denis Gasparin; and the one about ULSS's (Regional Healthcare System) migration to Open Source, given by Giorgio Roncolato, proving that more institutions than we thought (more…)

Untangling the PostgreSQL upgrade

pglogical, PostgreSQL
PostgreSQL 9.6 has just been released and most of the postgres users will start asking themselves how to upgrade to the new major version. This post has the intention of showing different procedures for upgrading your PostgreSQL server. Upgrading to a new major version is a task which has a high ratio of preparation over total execution time. Specifically when skipping a release in the middle, for example, when you jump from version 9.3 to version 9.5. Point releases On the other hand, point release upgrades don't need as much preparation. Generally, the only requirement is for the postgres service to be restarted. There are no changes to the underlying data structure, so there's no need to dump and restore. In the worst case scenario you may need to recreate some of your indexes (more…)
Evolution of Fault Tolerance in PostgreSQL: Synchronous Commit

Evolution of Fault Tolerance in PostgreSQL: Synchronous Commit

2ndQuadrant, Featured, Gulcin's PlanetPostgreSQL, PostgreSQL
PostgreSQL is an awesome project and it evolves at an amazing rate. We’ll focus on evolution of fault tolerance capabilities in PostgreSQL throughout its versions with a series of blog posts. This is the fourth post of the series and we’ll talk about synchronous commit and its effects on fault tolerance and dependability of PostgreSQL. If you would like to witness the evolution progress from the beginning, please check the first three blog posts of the series below. Each post is independent, so you don't actually need to read one to understand another. Evolution of Fault Tolerance in PostgreSQL  Evolution of Fault Tolerance in PostgreSQL: Replication Phase  Evolution of Fault Tolerance in PostgreSQL: Time Travel Synchronous Commit By default, PostgreSQL (more…)
Evolution of Fault Tolerance in PostgreSQL: Time Travel

Evolution of Fault Tolerance in PostgreSQL: Time Travel

2ndQuadrant, Featured, Gulcin's PlanetPostgreSQL, PostgreSQL
PostgreSQL is an awesome project and it evolves at an amazing rate. We’ll focus on evolution of fault tolerance capabilities in PostgreSQL throughout its versions with a series of blog posts. This is the third post of the series and we’ll talk about timeline issues and their effects on fault tolerance and dependability of PostgreSQL. If you would like to witness the evolution progress from the beginning, please check the first two blog posts of the series: Evolution of Fault Tolerance in PostgreSQL  Evolution of Fault Tolerance in PostgreSQL: Replication Phase  Timelines The ability to restore the database to a previous point in time creates some complexities which we’ll cover some of the cases by explaining failover (Fig. 1), switchover (Fig. 2) and pg_rewind (Fig (more…)
Evolution of Fault Tolerance in PostgreSQL: Replication Phase

Evolution of Fault Tolerance in PostgreSQL: Replication Phase

2ndQuadrant, Featured, Gulcin's PlanetPostgreSQL, PostgreSQL
PostgreSQL is an awesome project and it evolves at an amazing rate. We’ll focus on evolution of fault tolerance capabilities in PostgreSQL throughout its versions with a series of blog posts. This is the second post of the series and we'll talk about replication and its importance on fault tolerance and dependability of PostgreSQL. If you would like to witness the evolution progress from the beginning, please check the first blog post of the series: Evolution of Fault Tolerance in PostgreSQL PostgreSQL Replication Database replication is the term we use to describe the technology used to maintain a copy of a set of data on a remote system.  Keeping a reliable copy of a running system is one of the biggest concerns of redundancy and we all like maintainable, easy-to-use and (more…)
Redislog: Integrating PostgreSQL with Logstash for devops real-time monitoring

Redislog: Integrating PostgreSQL with Logstash for devops real-time monitoring

Featured, Gabriele's PlanetPostgreSQL
During the last October's Italian PGDay and European PostgreSQL conference, my friend Marco Nenciarini and I had the pleasure to talk about a new open source plugin for PostgreSQL, called redislog. In that presentation ("Integrating PostgreSQL with Logstash for real-time monitoring") we provided an example of our exploration/experimentation approach, with extensive and thorough coverage of testing and benchmarking activities. If you are curious to know more about that process, please refer to the slides of that talk, which are publicly available on Prezi. For the impatient: redislog taps into PostgreSQL's logging facility and allows DBAs to ship log events into a Redis queue, directly in JSON format, and to enter the ELK stack through the first class lane. Devops and the (more…)