Monday, June 26

Tag: DBA

PGDay.IT 2016 in Prato, Italy

PGDay.IT 2016 in Prato, Italy

2ndQuadrant, Jonathan's PlanetPostgreSQL
This year, the ITPUG (Italian Postgres User Group) organized PGDay in Prato, my hometown and city where the association was born, although most of the members are from outside of the Tuscany region.It was my pleasure to contribute to the community by sharing my professional experience. I gave a talk about PostgreSQL on Network File System, a research based on crash tests to prove reliability using PostgreSQL on NFS. Sharing my PostgreSQL experience with the participants was useful and pleasant.During the event, I had the chance to attend the talk about tools for upgrading Postgres between major releases given by Denis Gasparin; and the one about ULSS's (Regional Healthcare System) migration to Open Source, given by Giorgio Roncolato, proving that more institutions than we thought a
Evolution of Fault Tolerance in PostgreSQL: Synchronous Commit

Evolution of Fault Tolerance in PostgreSQL: Synchronous Commit

2ndQuadrant, Featured, Gulcin's PlanetPostgreSQL, PostgreSQL
PostgreSQL is an awesome project and it evolves at an amazing rate. We’ll focus on evolution of fault tolerance capabilities in PostgreSQL throughout its versions with a series of blog posts. This is the fourth post of the series and we’ll talk about synchronous commit and its effects on fault tolerance and dependability of PostgreSQL.If you would like to witness the evolution progress from the beginning, please check the first three blog posts of the series below. Each post is independent, so you don't actually need to read one to understand another.Evolution of Fault Tolerance in PostgreSQL  Evolution of Fault Tolerance in PostgreSQL: Replication Phase  Evolution of Fault Tolerance in PostgreSQL: Time TravelSynchronous CommitBy default, PostgreSQL implements
Evolution of Fault Tolerance in PostgreSQL: Time Travel

Evolution of Fault Tolerance in PostgreSQL: Time Travel

2ndQuadrant, Featured, Gulcin's PlanetPostgreSQL, PostgreSQL
PostgreSQL is an awesome project and it evolves at an amazing rate. We’ll focus on evolution of fault tolerance capabilities in PostgreSQL throughout its versions with a series of blog posts. This is the third post of the series and we’ll talk about timeline issues and their effects on fault tolerance and dependability of PostgreSQL.If you would like to witness the evolution progress from the beginning, please check the first two blog posts of the series:Evolution of Fault Tolerance in PostgreSQL  Evolution of Fault Tolerance in PostgreSQL: Replication Phase Timelines The ability to restore the database to a previous point in time creates some complexities which we’ll cover some of the cases by explaining failover (Fig. 1), switchover (Fig. 2) and pg_rewind (Fig. 3) case
Evolution of Fault Tolerance in PostgreSQL: Replication Phase

Evolution of Fault Tolerance in PostgreSQL: Replication Phase

2ndQuadrant, Featured, Gulcin's PlanetPostgreSQL, PostgreSQL
PostgreSQL is an awesome project and it evolves at an amazing rate. We’ll focus on evolution of fault tolerance capabilities in PostgreSQL throughout its versions with a series of blog posts. This is the second post of the series and we'll talk about replication and its importance on fault tolerance and dependability of PostgreSQL.If you would like to witness the evolution progress from the beginning, please check the first blog post of the series: Evolution of Fault Tolerance in PostgreSQLPostgreSQL Replication Database replication is the term we use to describe the technology used to maintain a copy of a set of data on a remote system.  Keeping a reliable copy of a running system is one of the biggest concerns of redundancy and we all like maintainable, easy-to-use and stable
Conference isn’t enough?!  Join us for post-conference training!

Conference isn’t enough?! Join us for post-conference training!

2ndQuadrant, International News
Did you know - 2ndQuadrant has the largest single, collection of PostgreSQL experts of any company globally?!With a team of some of the best known developers, they all still actively contribute to the progressive development of PostgreSQL. Would you like to have access to some of the most knowledgeable and experienced people available? The 5432...MeetUs! post-conference training is your chance!In addition to the Kanban System Design training course with Dragos Dumitriu we mentioned last week, there will be a variety of other training courses in the days following the 5432...MeetUs! conference.  When you attend a course with 2ndQuadrant, you learn from experts who understand PostgreSQL, the platforms, programs, and languages at the deepest level.Learn in depth about the tas
Second Edition of 5432…MeetUs!

Second Edition of 5432…MeetUs!

2ndQuadrant, Britt's PlanetPostgreSQL, International News
The second edition of the 5432...MeetUs! conference is sure to be one to remember.  They will be hosting PostgreSQL experts, users, and contributors from all over the world.  With talks, workshops, and trainings - we are sure to stay busy every minute!With speakers like Zalando's Valentine Gogichasvili and IBM's Andrea Vercellini, it will be great to be in good company with fellow PostgreSQL supporters and hear real life case studies of individuals who have successfully applied PostgreSQL and Open Source practices and tools within their enterprises.In addition to the independent developers, other companies we look forward to catching up with at the event include Dalibo, Subito.it, Navionics, InnoGames, PaxLife, and more.Check out who all will be in attendance!Even bette
PostgreSQL User Group NL

PostgreSQL User Group NL

Gianni's PlanetPostgreSQL, International News, PostgreSQL, User Group
Last week I was invited by the Dutch PostgreSQL User Group in Amsterdam to speak on PostgreSQL Administration Recipes. It was the first session of 2016, and the third since they started meeting last year.Using the simple format of a cooking recipe, I presented some techniques that a PostgreSQL DBA can use to solve recurring problems, for instance: change your password without leaving traces of the new password around; quickly estimate the number of rows in a table; see which parameters have a non-default setting; temporarily disable an index without dropping it. The last recipe was more philosophical: plan your backups, or better yet, plan your recovery!After my talk I listened to the interesting presentation from Reiner Peterke who described pg_inside, his tool for collecting