Saturday, June 24

Tag: asynchronous

Evolution of Fault Tolerance in PostgreSQL: Synchronous Commit

Evolution of Fault Tolerance in PostgreSQL: Synchronous Commit

2ndQuadrant, Featured, Gulcin's PlanetPostgreSQL, PostgreSQL
PostgreSQL is an awesome project and it evolves at an amazing rate. We’ll focus on evolution of fault tolerance capabilities in PostgreSQL throughout its versions with a series of blog posts. This is the fourth post of the series and we’ll talk about synchronous commit and its effects on fault tolerance and dependability of PostgreSQL.If you would like to witness the evolution progress from the beginning, please check the first three blog posts of the series below. Each post is independent, so you don't actually need to read one to understand another.Evolution of Fault Tolerance in PostgreSQL  Evolution of Fault Tolerance in PostgreSQL: Replication Phase  Evolution of Fault Tolerance in PostgreSQL: Time TravelSynchronous CommitBy default, PostgreSQL implements
Evolution of Fault Tolerance in PostgreSQL

Evolution of Fault Tolerance in PostgreSQL

2ndQuadrant, Featured, Gulcin's PlanetPostgreSQL, PostgreSQL
"It is paradoxical, yet true, to say, that the more we know, the more ignorant we become in the absolute sense, for it is only through enlightenment that we become conscious of our limitations. Precisely one of the most gratifying results of intellectual evolution is the continuous opening up of new and greater prospects." Nikola TeslaPostgreSQL is an awesome project and it evolves at an amazing rate. We'll focus on evolution of fault tolerance capabilities in PostgreSQL throughout its versions with a series of blog posts. (more…)

BDR for PostgreSQL: Present and future

Craig's PlanetPostgreSQL
For a couple of years now a team at 2ndQuadrant led by Andres Freund have been working on adding bi-directional asynchronous multi-master replication support for PostgreSQL. This effort has become known as the BDR project.We're really excited to see these efforts leading to new PostgreSQL features and have a great deal more still to come.Incremental Development As a large development project it is neither practical nor desirable to deliver all the changes to PostgreSQL as a single huge patch. That way lies madness and unmaintainable code. It would also be resoundingly rejected by the PostgreSQL community, as it should be.Instead, BDR has been developed as a series of discrete changes to core PostgreSQL, plus an extension that uses those core changes to implement multi-master a...