Tuesday, April 24

PostgreSQL

Near-Zero Downtime Automated Upgrades of PostgreSQL Clusters in Cloud (Part I)

Near-Zero Downtime Automated Upgrades of PostgreSQL Clusters in Cloud (Part I)

2ndQuadrant, DevOps, Featured, Gulcin's PlanetPostgreSQL, pglogical, PostgreSQL
Last week, I was at Nordic PGDay 2018 and I had quite a few conversations about the tool that I wrote, namely pglupgrade, to automate PostgreSQL major version upgrades in a replication cluster setup. I was quite happy that it has been heard and some other people in different communities giving talks at meetups and other conferences about near-zero downtime upgrades using logical replication. Given that there is a talk that I gave at PGDAY'17 Russia, PGConf.EU 2017 in Warsaw and lastly at FOSDEM PGDay 2018 in Brussels, I thought it is better to create a blog post to keep this presentation available to the folks who could not make it to any of the conferences aforementioned. If you would like to directly go the talk and skip reading this blog post here is your link: Near-Zero Downtime (more…)
Prague PostgreSQL Meetup

Prague PostgreSQL Meetup

2ndQuadrant, Featured, Gulcin's PlanetPostgreSQL, International News, PostgreSQL, User Group
Last month, I was at 2ndQuadrant booth at P2D2, an annual conference organized in Prague by local user group called CSPUG (Czech and Slovak PostgreSQL User Group). The conference was certainly a huge success and more than 200 people showed up! Meeting a lot of PostgreSQL enthusiasts in town, I wondered why there are no regular meetups in Prague. At the conference after-party, I started to question folks and learned that given a chance some of them would give talks and many more would be happy to attend. The initial reactions verified my observation and I felt motivated enough to start organizing meetups myself! Even though I've been living in Prague for some time now, it has been a little difficult to manage the myself all by myself. My colleague Tomas Vondra stepped forward to (more…)
PostgreSQL Meltdown Benchmarks

PostgreSQL Meltdown Benchmarks

2ndQuadrant, PostgreSQL, Tomas' PlanetPostgreSQL
Two serious security vulnerabilities (code named Meltdown and Spectre) were revealed a couple of weeks ago. Initial tests suggested the performance impact of mitigations (added in the kernel) might be up to ~30% for some workloads, depending on the syscall rate. Those early estimates had to be done quickly, and so were based on limited amounts of testing. Furthermore, the in-kernel fixes evolved and improved over time, and we now also got retpoline which should address Spectre v2. This post presents data from more thorough tests, hopefully providing more reliable estimates for typical PostgreSQL workloads. (more…)

Here’s How You Can Run OmniDB On Postgres10 [VIDEO]

Liaqat's PlanetPostgreSQL, OmniDB, PostgreSQL
OmniDB is an open source web tool designed specifically for managing relational databases with focus on simplicity and user interaction, but at the same time be fast, powerful and light on memory. OmniDB, at the moment, supports several different relational database systems such as PostgreSQL. The latest release of OmniDB, version 2.3.0, has introduced ‘Debugger for PL/pgSQL functions’ - a much requested feature for OmniDB users. If you’re a PostgreSQL user and want to extract the power of its functionalities through a simple GUI tool, here is Simon Riggs from 2ndQuadrant demonstrating how to run OmniDB on top of PostgreSQL 10. Transcript: My name is Simon Riggs from 2ndQuadrant, and I’m going to give you a demo of OmniDB running on top of Postgres 10. What is OmniDB (more…)

Oracle High Availability concepts in PostgreSQL

2ndQuadrant, Barman, PostgreSQL, Simon's PlanetPostgreSQL
Sometimes people ask about certain Oracle High Availability features and whether they exist in PostgreSQL. In most cases, very similar features exist. The reason for the similarity is that PostgreSQL and Oracle have very similar architectures and so the mechanisms to protect data have also developed along the same lines. For example, Oracle Data Guard is streaming replication of the transaction log, so is very similar in concept to physical streaming replication in PostgreSQL. Active Data Guard is where Oracle users can run queries on a standby server, which again is similar in concept to Hot Standby. Oracle RAC? You don't really need Oracle RAC. Or at least qualified Oracle experts tell me so and my own hands on experience confirms that. Not least because disaster recovery for (more…)

Future of Postgres-XL

PostgreSQL, Tomas' PlanetPostgreSQL
You probably know that Postgres-XL is a distributed database based on PostgreSQL. A few days ago we pushed the XL 9.6 code into the public git repository. Additional details about the new stuff available in Postgres-XL 9.6 are available here. The topic of this blog post is quite different, though. I'd like to discuss some changes to the project management and development practices, and why (and how) we plan to tweak it. (more…)

More robust collations with ICU support in PostgreSQL 10

Eisentraut's PlanetPostgreSQL, PostgreSQL
In this article, I want to introduce the ICU support in PostgreSQL, which I have worked on for PostgreSQL version 10, to appear later this year. Sorting Sorting is an important functionality of a database system. First, users generally want to see data sorted. Any query result that contains more than one row and is destined for end-user consumption will probably want to be sorted, just for a better user experience. Second, a lot of the internal functionality of a database system depends on sorting data or having sorted data available. B-tree indexes are an obvious example. BRIN indexes have knowledge of order. Range partitioning has to compare values. Merge joins depend on sorted input. The idea that is common to these different techniques is that, roughly speaking, if you have sorted (more…)

What’s new in Postgres-XL 9.6

2ndQuadrant, PostgreSQL, Tomas' PlanetPostgreSQL
For the last few months, we at 2ndQuadrant have been working on merging PostgreSQL 9.6 into Postgres-XL, which turned out to be quite challenging for various reasons, and took more time than initially planned due to several invasive upstream changes. If you’re interested, look at the official repository here (look at the “master” branch for now). There’s still quite a bit of work to be done - merging a few remaining bits from upstream, fixing known bugs and regression failures, testing, etc. If you’re considering contributing to Postgres-XL, this is an ideal opportunity (send me an e-mail and I’ll help you with the first steps). But overall, Postgres-XL 9.6 is clearly a major step forward in a number of important areas. (more…)

In the defense of sar (and how to configure it)

2ndQuadrant, PostgreSQL, Tomas' PlanetPostgreSQL
Let me discuss a topic that is not inherently PostgreSQL specific, but that I regularly run into while investigating issues on customer systems, evaluating "supportability" of those systems, etc. It's the importance of having a monitoring solution for system metrics, configuring it reasonably, and why sar is still by far my favorite tool (at least on Linux). (more…)

PostgreSQL 10 identity columns explained

Eisentraut's PlanetPostgreSQL, PostgreSQL
For PostgreSQL 10, I have worked on a feature called "identity columns". Depesz already wrote a blog post about it and showed that it works pretty much like serial columns: CREATE TABLE test_old ( id serial PRIMARY KEY, payload text ); INSERT INTO test_old (payload) VALUES ('a'), ('b'), ('c') RETURNING *; and CREATE TABLE test_new ( id int GENERATED BY DEFAULT AS IDENTITY PRIMARY KEY, payload text ); INSERT INTO test_new (payload) VALUES ('a'), ('b'), ('c') RETURNING *; do pretty much the same thing, except that the new way is more verbose. ;-) So why bother? Compatibility The new syntax conforms to the SQL standard. Creating auto-incrementing columns has been a notorious area of incompatibility between different SQL implementations. Some have lately (more…)