Tuesday, April 24

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Near-Zero Downtime Automated Upgrades of PostgreSQL Clusters in Cloud (Part I)

Near-Zero Downtime Automated Upgrades of PostgreSQL Clusters in Cloud (Part I)

2ndQuadrant, DevOps, Featured, Gulcin's PlanetPostgreSQL, pglogical, PostgreSQL
Last week, I was at Nordic PGDay 2018 and I had quite a few conversations about the tool that I wrote, namely pglupgrade, to automate PostgreSQL major version upgrades in a replication cluster setup. I was quite happy that it has been heard and some other people in different communities giving talks at meetups and other conferences about near-zero downtime upgrades using logical replication. Given that there is a talk that I gave at PGDAY'17 Russia, PGConf.EU 2017 in Warsaw and lastly at FOSDEM PGDay 2018 in Brussels, I thought it is better to create a blog post to keep this presentation available to the folks who could not make it to any of the conferences aforementioned. If you would like to directly go the talk and skip reading this blog post here is your link: Near-Zero Downtime (more…)
Prague PostgreSQL Meetup

Prague PostgreSQL Meetup

2ndQuadrant, Featured, Gulcin's PlanetPostgreSQL, International News, PostgreSQL, User Group
Last month, I was at 2ndQuadrant booth at P2D2, an annual conference organized in Prague by local user group called CSPUG (Czech and Slovak PostgreSQL User Group). The conference was certainly a huge success and more than 200 people showed up! Meeting a lot of PostgreSQL enthusiasts in town, I wondered why there are no regular meetups in Prague. At the conference after-party, I started to question folks and learned that given a chance some of them would give talks and many more would be happy to attend. The initial reactions verified my observation and I felt motivated enough to start organizing meetups myself! Even though I've been living in Prague for some time now, it has been a little difficult to manage the myself all by myself. My colleague Tomas Vondra stepped forward to (more…)
CHAR (16) – Another conference on the horizon but with a focus on business

CHAR (16) – Another conference on the horizon but with a focus on business

2ndQuadrant, Featured, Howard Postgres Marketing World, Howard's PlanetPostgreSQL, United States News
The PostgreSQL user community is becoming spoilt with a choice of excellent events organized by both local user groups and commercial organizations supporting the PostgreSQL project.  And amongst the events taking place in December, the one you definitely shouldn't miss attending is CHAR(16). ‘CHAR(16): Scalability for Business’ is intended to fulfill a different requirement - different to the many excellent PostgreSQL related events we attend and support. Different because we’ve set out to organize a conference that is business focused and specifically we want to highlight the impact the PostgreSQL Development Group is making on database scalability for enterprises, addressing the need to scale. The need to scale databases is probably high on most technical departments (more…)
Committed to the PostgreSQL Community, 2ndQuadrant Contributes to 9.6

Committed to the PostgreSQL Community, 2ndQuadrant Contributes to 9.6

2ndQuadrant, Featured, Umair's PlanetPostgreSQL
The latest version of PostgreSQL 9.6 is planned to be released later today, bringing with it some much anticipated features and updates. As the most advanced open source database, PostgreSQL strives to release a major version roughly once every year. With an active and collaborative community, this PostgreSQL release boasts impressive features and updates thanks to contributions from many of the highly knowledgeable community members.   The expanding team at 2ndQuadrant has continued to show dedication to the PostgreSQL database project by contributing heavily to the PostgreSQL 9.6 release. Parallel execution of large queries has been a known shortcoming of PostgreSQL for some time, but this is no longer an issue with the 9.6 release. David Rowley and Simon Riggs contributed to (more…)
Back to the Future Pt. 2: How to use pg_rewind with PostgreSQL 9.5

Back to the Future Pt. 2: How to use pg_rewind with PostgreSQL 9.5

2ndQuadrant, Featured, Giuseppe's PlanetPostgreSQL
In the previous blog article we have seen how pg_rewind works with a simple HA cluster, composed of a master node replicating to a standby. In this context, an eventual switchover involves just two nodes that have to be aligned. But what happens with HA clusters when there are several (also cascading) standbys? Now, consider a more complicated HA cluster, composed of a master with two standbys, based on PostgreSQL 9.5; similar to what has been made in the first blog article dedicated to pg_rewind, we now create a master node replicating to two standby instances. Let's start with the master: # Set PATH variable export PATH=/usr/pgsql-9.5/bin:${PATH} # This is the directory where we will be working on # Feel free to change it and the rest of the script # will adapt itself (more…)
Back to the Future Pt. 1: Introduction to pg_rewind

Back to the Future Pt. 1: Introduction to pg_rewind

2ndQuadrant, Featured, Giuseppe's PlanetPostgreSQL
Since PostgreSQL 9.5, pg_rewind has been able to make a former master follow up a promoted standby although, in the meantime, it proceeded with its own timeline. Consider, for instance, the case of a switchover that didn't work properly. Have you ever experienced a "split brain" during a switchover operation? You know, when the goal is to switch the roles of the master and the standby, but instead you end up with two independent masters - each one with its own timeline? For PostgreSQL DBAs in HA contexts, this where pg_rewind comes in handy! Until PostgreSQL 9.5, there was only one solution to this problem: re-synchronise the PGDATA of the downgraded master with a new base backup and add it to the HA cluster as a new standby node. Generally, this is not a problem, unless your (more…)
Evolution of Fault Tolerance in PostgreSQL: Synchronous Commit

Evolution of Fault Tolerance in PostgreSQL: Synchronous Commit

2ndQuadrant, Featured, Gulcin's PlanetPostgreSQL, PostgreSQL
PostgreSQL is an awesome project and it evolves at an amazing rate. We’ll focus on evolution of fault tolerance capabilities in PostgreSQL throughout its versions with a series of blog posts. This is the fourth post of the series and we’ll talk about synchronous commit and its effects on fault tolerance and dependability of PostgreSQL. If you would like to witness the evolution progress from the beginning, please check the first three blog posts of the series below. Each post is independent, so you don't actually need to read one to understand another. Evolution of Fault Tolerance in PostgreSQL  Evolution of Fault Tolerance in PostgreSQL: Replication Phase  Evolution of Fault Tolerance in PostgreSQL: Time Travel Synchronous Commit By default, PostgreSQL (more…)
PostgreSQL vs. Linux kernel versions

PostgreSQL vs. Linux kernel versions

2ndQuadrant, Featured, PostgreSQL, Tomas' PlanetPostgreSQL
I've published multiple benchmarks comparing different PostgreSQL versions, as for example the performance archaeology talk (evaluating PostgreSQL 7.4 up to 9.4), and all those benchmark assumed fixed environment (hardware, kernel, ...). Which is fine in many cases (e.g. when evaluating performance impact of a patch), but on production those things do change over time - you get hardware upgrades and from time to time you get an update with a new kernel version. For hardware upgrades (better storage, more RAM, faster CPUs, ...), the impact is usually fairly easy to predict, and moreover people generally realize they need to assess the impact by analyzing the bottlenecks on production and perhaps even testing the new hardware first. But for what about kernel updates? Sadly we usually don't do much benchmarking in this area. The assumption is mostly that new kernels are better than older ones (faster, more efficient, scale to more CPU cores). But is it really true? And how big is the difference? For example what if you upgrade a kernel from 3.0 to 4.7 - will that affect the performance, and if yes, will the performance improve or not? (more…)